LISTENING STYLE

Get Started. It's Free
or sign up with your email address
LISTENING STYLE by Mind Map: LISTENING STYLE

1. according to the primary role as listener, identical procedures as used for the classification of LSP-R styles (described above) were utilized for the role as listener items.

2. several other limitations accompany the conclusions of this study.

3. Listening

4. Several other conclusions can be drawn from this table including the large number of multistyle listeners (>170). Additionally, people seemed to self categorize via the LSP-R with greater variability than their reported roles as listener.

5. Research Questions

6. The purpose of this study is to assess the degree of stability of an individual’s primary listening style.

7. listening styles change according to demands of the particular interaction, acknowledging that listening styles, like other communication skills, can be competently performed according to situation and function (Spitzberg, 2003) and purposefully utilized in pursuit of personal goals (Berger, 2011).

8. DEFINITION of LISTENING STYLE

9. The second questionable claim is that listening styles represent habitual reactions which remain relatively constant across various listening situations.

10. First, the original operationalization of listening styles, the Listening Styles Profile (LSP-16) has recently been shown to exhibit less than ideal psychometric properties

11. The Best Way to Understand People is to Listen to them. { RALPH G. NICHOLS }

12. Styles seem to represent cognitive schemas people hold for situational listening in that they are purposefully deployed according to the demands of the interaction and goals of the listener.

13. METHOD

14. Data were collected in a reserved computer laboratory that accommodated up to 25 participants per session.

15. Procedures

16. Listening styles were originally conceptualized as listening responses that individuals naturally orient .towards especially in novel situations (Imhof, 2004) and captured four listening orientations: people, content, action, and time.

17. Participants provided an account of a time when they used a listening style of their choice.

18. Measures

19. Participant narratives

20. Western Journal of Communication. Listening as a Goal-Directed Activity Christopher C. Gearhart , Jonathan P. Denham & Graham D.Bodie. Western Journal of Communication Vol. 78, No. 5, October–December 2014, pp. 668–684.

20.1. NAME : MULYANA MEI FANI CLASS : PBI -1 / II *INTERMEDIATE LISTENING *

21. listening styles change according to demands of the particular interaction, acknowledging that listening styles, like other communication skills, can be competently performed according to situation and function (Spitzberg, 2003) and purposefully utilized in pursuit of personal goals (Berger, 2011).

22. HABITUAL NATURE of LISTENING STYLES

23. Examination of Style Stability

24. RECONCEPTUALIZATION

25. To be considered habitual a listening style must fulfill two criteria: First, it must be stable over time. second, it should be relatively consistent across situations.

26. Role as listener

27. Features of the interaction

28. Limitations and Directions for Future Research.

29. Listening styles vary as a function of the nuances of interpersonal communication.

30. Participants

31. To understand the general nature of listening situations, participants evaluated their specific interactions on two bases: 1) the nature of the interaction itself and 2) their goals as the listener in the interaction.

32. Likert response scaling to assess the degree to which participants generally utilize each listening style.

33. features accounting for the most importance in determining how a participant listened in a particular listening situation.

34. Intermediate

35. Finish