The Impact of WWI on Russia

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The Impact of WWI on Russia by Mind Map: The Impact of WWI on Russia

1. Tsar/Aristocracy

1.1. August 1914: Russia enters WW1 as a part of the Triple Alliance and patriotism soars as Russia takes a role of slavic protector

1.2. Russia Suffered 9.15 million casualties (out of 13 million total mobilised soldiers) during the First World War

1.3. War contracts led to the creation of 3.5 million new industrial jobs between 1914-16

1.4. The Tsar attempted to force Muslims into conscription and they revolted. The revolt was then cruelly suppressed by the army.

1.5. The Council of United Nobility (a union of the gentry which was created in response to the 1905-06 revolts) called for the Tsar to step down in late 1916

1.6. By 1916, many industrialists did not have access to the raw materials they needed to support the army.

1.7. In 1907, voting rules restricted opponents of the Tsar from being elected to the Duma.

1.8. Industries in Russia could not support the demand for military supplies including rifles, ammunition, artillery and even boots

1.9. The peasants who joined the army had strong anti-German motivations rather than loyalty to the Tsar

1.10. December 1916: A group of nobles assassinates Rasputin to end his influence on the royal family.

1.11. The Tsar left his German wife, Tsarina Alexandra, in charge of the government. He left for the front to lead the armed forces.

1.12. September 1915: Tsar Nicholas II takes command of the armed forces. This did not particularly change the military strategies of the Russian army.

1.13. In 1915, the Progressive Bloc of the Duma tried to convince the Tsar to allow for more representation in the Duma and he responded by dismissing the Duma.

1.14. Officers in the army were of the aristocratic class and had long-held beliefs about how peasants should be treated.

1.15. The Tsar increasingly relied on Rasputin and it appeared he was gaining increased influence in the government.

1.16. the government could not afford to keep up payments for food for the army despite high levels of food production.

2. Army

2.1. August 1914: Russia enters WW1 as a part of the Triple Alliance and patriotism soars as Russia takes a role of slavic protector

2.2. Russia Suffered 9.15 million casualties (out of 13 million total mobilised soldiers) during the First World War

2.3. The Russian army was made up of conscripts who were initially enthusiastically patriotic.

2.4. The conscripted army was overwhelmingly made up of peasants.

2.5. 13 million peasants were conscripted off of aristocratic farms.

2.6. Officers in the army were of the aristocratic class and had long-held beliefs about how peasants should be treated.

2.7. The rail network could not cope with the needs of the overcrowded cities, industrial sector nor the army

2.8. Many zemstva set up their own, more effective medical services and supply lines for the troops.

2.9. The Tsar attempted to force Muslims into conscription and they revolted. The revolt was then cruelly suppressed by the army.

2.10. August 1914: Russia mobilizes a massive force of 650,000-800,000 men and invades East Prussia

2.11. 2 million Russian soldiers were wounded or killed in 1915 alone.

2.12. In 1915, the Progressive Bloc of the Duma tried to convince the Tsar to allow for more representation in the Duma and he responded by dismissing the Duma.

2.13. September 1915: Tsar Nicholas II takes command of the armed forces, This did not particularly change the military strategies of the Russian army.

2.14. By 1916, many industrialists did not have access to the raw materials they needed to support the army.

2.15. The middle class led many local governments (zemstva) and had access to government reports from the army.

2.16. The East Prussia campaign ended in a decisive defeat by the Germans who were better trained and better equipped.

2.17. Industries in Russia could not support the demand for military supplies including rifles, ammunition, artillery and even boots

2.18. The peasants who joined the army had strong anti-German motivations rather than loyalty to the Tsar

2.19. Early summer 1916: General Brusilov successfully leads a massive Russian force into Austrian territory.

2.20. Late summer 1916: Brusilov's Offensive stalls and is eventually pushed back with 500,000 dead (on top of the 500,000 already killed that year)

2.21. the government could not afford to keep up payments for food for the army despite high levels of food production.

3. The Middle Class

3.1. August 1914: Russia enters WW1 as a part of the Triple Alliance and patriotism soars as Russia takes a role of slavic protector

3.2. The rail network could not cope with the needs of the overcrowded cities, industrial sector nor the army

3.3. The Council of United Nobility (a union of the gentry which was created in response to the 1905-06 revolts) called for the Tsar to step down in late 1916

3.4. War contracts led to the creation of 3.5 million new industrial jobs between 1914-16

3.5. Many zemstva set up their own, more effective medical services and supply lines for the troops.

3.6. The middle class led many local governments (zemstva) and had access to government reports from the army.

3.7. In 1907, voting rules restricted opponents of the Tsar from being elected to the Duma.

3.8. 2 million Russian soldiers were wounded or killed in 1915 alone.

3.9. Cities experienced overcrowding as a result of job migration which they could not support with resources.

3.10. In 1915, the Progressive Bloc of the Duma tried to convince the Tsar to allow for more representation in the Duma and he responded by dismissing the Duma.

4. Peasants/Workers

4.1. August 1914: Russia enters WW1 as a part of the Triple Alliance and patriotism soars as Russia takes a role of slavic protector

4.2. Russia Suffered 9.15 million casualties (out of 13 million total mobilised soldiers) during the First World War

4.3. The Russian army was made up of conscripts who were initially enthusiastically patriotic.

4.4. 13 million peasants were conscripted off of aristocratic farms.

4.5. Workers' wages steadily decreased as the overall number of workers, supply prices and availability of goods decreased.

4.6. War contracts led to the creation of 3.5 million new industrial jobs between 1914-16

4.7. the years leading up to the war saw a continuous rise in strikes and number of workers involved in the strikes.

4.8. By 1916, many industrialists did not have access to the raw materials they needed to support the army.

4.9. The peasants who joined the army had strong anti-German motivations rather than loyalty to the Tsar

4.10. 2 million Russian soldiers were wounded or killed in 1915 alone.

4.11. The conscripted army was overwhelmingly made up of peasants.

4.12. Cities experienced overcrowding as a result of job migration which they could not support with resources.

4.13. Officers in the army were of the aristocratic class and had long-held beliefs about how peasants should be treated.

4.14. the government could not afford to keep up payments for food for the army despite high levels of food production.