My Foundation of Education

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My Foundation of Education Door Mind Map: My Foundation of Education

1. Philosophy of Education

1.1. Meaning

1.1.1. metaphysics

1.1.2. epistemology

1.2. Philosophies

1.2.1. Idealism

1.2.2. Realism

1.2.3. Existenrialism

1.2.4. Phenomenology

1.2.5. Pragmatism

1.2.6. Neo-Marxism

1.2.7. Postmodernist

1.2.8. Critical theory

2. Sociological Perspectives

2.1. Uses

2.2. Effects of Schooling on Individuals

2.2.1. Knowledge

2.2.2. Attitudes

2.2.3. Employment

2.2.4. Education

2.2.5. Mobility

2.3. School and Society

2.4. Theoretical Perspectives

2.4.1. Functional

2.4.2. Conflict

2.4.3. Interactional

2.5. Inside the Schools

2.5.1. Teacher Behavior

2.5.2. Peer

2.5.3. Alienation

2.6. Education and Inequality

2.6.1. Inadequate schools

2.6.2. tracking

2.6.3. segragation

2.6.4. gender

3. Schools as Organizations

3.1. Structure

3.1.1. Governance

3.1.2. Size

3.1.3. Degree

3.1.4. Composition

3.1.5. Openness

3.1.6. Private Schools

3.2. Comparisons

3.2.1. Great Britian

3.2.2. France

3.2.3. Japan

3.2.4. Former Soviet Union

3.2.5. Germany

3.2.6. Finland

3.3. Processes and Cultures

3.3.1. Waller

3.3.2. Definite population

3.3.3. Political Structure

3.3.4. Social Interaction

3.3.5. Social Relationships

3.3.6. Max Weber

3.4. Teaching and Professionalization

3.4.1. Horance's Compromise

3.4.2. Theodore Sizer

4. Educational Inequality

4.1. Unequal Education Achievement

4.1.1. extra school explanations

4.1.2. within school explanations

4.1.3. students centered

4.1.4. school centered

4.2. Student Centered

4.2.1. within school differences

4.2.2. Coleman report

4.2.3. genetic differences

4.2.4. cultural deprivation theories

4.2.5. cultural differences theories

4.3. School Centered

4.3.1. school financing

4.3.2. effective school research

4.3.3. between school differences

4.3.4. within school differences

4.3.5. gender

4.3.6. schooling

4.4. Schools reproduce inequality?

4.4.1. Perell

4.4.2. Annette Lareau

5. Curriculum and Pedagory

5.1. History

5.1.1. Kliebard

5.1.2. The Struggle of the American Curriculum

5.1.3. Social Efficiency Curriculum

5.1.4. Cardinal Priciples

5.1.5. Pedagogical Progressivism

5.1.6. Developmentalist Curriculum

5.1.7. Social Meliorist Curriculum

5.2. Politics

5.2.1. Who Shapes the Curriculum?

5.2.2. Kirst

5.2.3. Influences on Curriculum Policy Making

5.3. Sociology

5.3.1. Functionalists

5.3.2. Emile Durkheim

5.3.3. Parsons

5.3.4. Multicultural education

5.4. Curriculum Theory

5.4.1. Progressive education

5.4.2. professionalization

5.4.3. Dewey

5.4.4. Experience and education

5.5. Practice

5.6. Pedagogic

5.6.1. The Practice of Teaching

5.6.2. mimetic

5.6.3. didactic method

5.7. Effects

6. Educational Reform

6.1. Effective Teachers

6.1.1. Small victories

6.1.2. Johnson

6.1.3. Educational Testing Service

6.2. 1980-2012

6.2.1. Nation at Risk

6.2.2. Time for results: the Governor's 1991 Report of Education

6.3. Federal Involovment

6.3.1. 6 national goals

6.3.2. 4 related themes

6.3.3. objectives

6.3.4. ESEA

6.3.5. Decade of reform

6.3.6. No Child Left Behind

6.3.7. Race To The Top

6.4. Approaches

6.4.1. Educational Equality Project

6.4.2. Broader Bolder Approach

6.5. School Based

6.5.1. School choice

6.5.2. Charter Schools

6.5.3. Tuition Vouchers

6.5.4. School-Business Partnership

6.5.5. Privation

6.5.6. School-to-work program

6.5.7. Teacher Education

6.5.8. Teacher Quality

6.5.9. Effective School Movement

6.6. Societal, Community, Economic, and Political

6.6.1. State Intervention

6.6.2. School Finance reforms

6.6.3. full service

6.6.4. Community Schools

6.6.5. Harlem children's Zone

6.6.6. Connecting school, community, and societal reforms

6.7. Theory

6.7.1. egalitarian realm

6.7.2. CCE 12 principles of education

6.7.3. Berliner and Biddle 10 principles

6.7.4. Cookson 10 basic education rights

6.7.5. Greene

6.7.6. "A few thoughts on making this work"

7. Equality of Opportunity

7.1. Educational and Life Outcomes

7.1.1. Estate Stratification

7.1.2. Class Stratification

7.1.3. Phillips

7.1.4. Status Attainment Process

7.2. Class

7.3. Race

7.4. Gender

7.5. Educational Achievement

7.6. Attainment of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Women Students

8. Politics of Education

8.1. Conservative

8.1.1. Looks at social evolution as a process that enables the strongest to survive.

8.1.2. People must compete in a social environment to survive.

8.1.3. From 19th Century social Darwinism

8.2. Liberal

8.2.1. 20th Century

8.2.2. Believes that free market, if left unregulated, is prone to significant abuse.

8.2.3. Concerned with balancing the economic productivity of capitalism with social and economical needs of the majority.

8.3. Radical

8.3.1. Believes that democratic socialism is a fairer political economic system.

8.3.2. Believes that the capitalistic system is central to U.S problems.

8.4. Neo-Liberal

8.4.1. Stress austerity, the market model, individualism, state intervention, and economic prosperity, race, and class.

8.4.2. Latest solutions in policy discussions of urban school reform and efforts to reduce the achievement gap.

8.5. Traditional

8.5.1. Views schools as necessary to the transmission to the traditional values of U.S society.

8.6. Progressivism

8.6.1. Views schools as central to solving social problems as essential to the development of individual potential, and as an integral part of a democratic society.

9. History of US Education

9.1. Age of Reform

9.1.1. Rise of the Common School

9.1.1.1. 1820-1860

9.1.1.2. Industrial Revolution

9.1.1.3. Right to vote

9.1.1.4. New reformers

9.1.1.5. Webster's "New Englad Primer"

9.1.1.6. Charity schools

9.1.1.7. Horance Mann (State Board of Education)

9.1.2. Education for Women and African Americans

9.1.2.1. Jean-Jacques Rousseau's "Emile"

9.1.2.2. Biologically harmful or too stressful

9.1.2.3. Emma Hart Willard

9.1.2.4. Troy Female Seminary in Troy, NY

9.1.2.5. Roberts vs City of Boston

9.1.3. Opposition to Public Education

9.1.3.1. Against Horace Mann's vision

9.1.3.2. Unjust

9.1.3.3. Private Academies

9.1.3.4. 1862 Morrill Act

9.2. Urbanization and the Progressive Impetus

9.2.1. John Dewey

9.2.2. Emergence of Public High School

9.2.2.1. NEA

9.2.2.2. Charles Eliot

9.2.2.2.1. Committee of Ten

9.2.2.3. Cardinal Principles

9.2.2.3.1. Health

9.2.2.3.2. Command of fundamental processes

9.2.2.3.3. worthy home membership

9.2.2.3.4. vocation

9.2.2.3.5. citizenship

9.2.2.3.6. worthy use of liesure

9.2.2.3.7. ethical character

9.3. Post WWII

9.3.1. Equity Era

9.3.2. 1945-1980

9.3.3. Cycles of Reform

9.3.3.1. regressive education

9.3.3.2. the great debate

9.3.3.3. Civil Rights Movement

9.3.3.4. Federal Leislation

9.3.3.5. New progressivism

9.3.3.6. "Ohio"

9.3.4. Equality of oppprtunity

9.3.4.1. Great equalizer

9.3.4.2. lever of social progressivism

9.3.4.3. GI Bill of Rights

9.3.4.4. Plessy vs. Ferguson

9.3.4.5. Souls of Black Folk

9.3.4.6. Brown vs. Board of ED

9.4. Standards Era

9.5. Different Historical Interpretaions

9.5.1. Democratic Liberal School

9.5.2. Radical Revision School

9.5.3. Conservative Perspectives